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Video Gaming Information

In 2009, the Orland Park Board of Trustees drafted and approved an ordinance to prohibit video gaming within the corporate limits of the village.

The board is reviewing the current video gaming ordinance and the impact it has had on Orland Park restaurants potentially losing business to communities that allow video gaming. A poll was conducted among the village’s 67 Class A liquor license holders with the results shown on the pie chart below. 

Declining sales tax revenue has made the board consider other sources of revenue.

A draft ordinance with several restrictions is attached. (This is a draft ordinance for discussion purposes. It does not indicate the position of any individual board member regarding this ordinance, but rather a starting point for constructive dialogue.) 

Potential restrictions include:

  • Limiting to established Class A liquor license holders (full service restaurants that have kitchens and full food menus).
  • Limiting signage
  • Establishing physical barriers for gaming areas inside establishments
  • Limiting noise and lights from gaming machines
  • Village warning sticker on all entrances that announce that Video Gaming is on the Premises
  • Waiting periods for new businesses
  • Requiring alarms and video surveillance of areas

Village staff has researched the feasibility of allowing video gaming in Orland Park and an economic impact study was conducted to determine how regional towns having video gaming affects Orland Park.  This study and other relevant facts are also included.

The Village of Orland Park Board of Trustees will hold a town hall meeting on Monday, November 27, 2017 at 7 p.m. at the Orland Park Civic Center, December 11th 2017 at 7 p.m. (location TBD) and January 8th, 2018 at 7 p.m (location TBD). 

Local residents and business owners are invited to express their views or ask questions of the Village Board regarding video gaming in Orland Park.


Special Town Hall Meeting

The members of the Board of Trustees of the Village of Orland Park will held a Special Town Hall Meeting on Monday, November 27, 2017 at 7:00 PM at the Orland Park Civic Center, 14750 Ravinia Avenue, Orland Park, Illinois in the Exhibition Room.

Special Meeting Notice and Agenda

Audio recording of meeting


A follow-up meeting was held on Monday, December 11, 2017 at 7:00 PM at the Orland Park Civic Center, 14750 Ravinia Avenue, Orland Park, Illinois in the Exhibition Room.


Special Meeting Notice and Agenda

Audio recording of meeting

A final town hall meeting on the topic will be held on Monday, January 8, 2018 at 7:00 PM at the Orland Park Civic Center, 14750 Ravinia Avenue, Orland Park, Illinois in the Exhibition Room.



Draft Ordinance
A draft ordinance with several restrictions appears here.

This is a draft ordinance for discussion purposes. It does not indicate the position of any individual board member regarding this ordinance, but rather a starting point for constructive dialogue. 

Illinois Video Gaming Laws and Standards
The Video Gaming Act

On July 13, 2009 Governor Pat Quinn signed the Video Gaming Act (Public Acts 096-0034, 096-0037 and 096- 0038) (the “Act”) making Licensed Video Gaming Terminals legal in Illinois. The Act allows for Licensed Video Gaming Terminals to be placed in certain liquor establishments, truck stops and fraternal/veterans clubs throughout the State. The Illinois Gaming Board (the “IGB” or “Board”) has the responsibility of implementing and regulating video gaming in Illinois.

The Video Gaming Act (230 ILCS 40)



Video Gaming FAQs
When was video gaming approved in Illinois?

The Video Gaming Act was enacted in July 2009, authorizing the placement of up to five Video Gaming Terminals (VGTs) in licensed Retail Establishments, Truck Stops, Veteran and Fraternal Establishments. The VGTs are all connected to and monitored by a Central Communications System.


What is a Video Gaming Terminal?

 
A “Video Gaming Terminal” (“VGT”) is an electronic video gaming machine that plays or simulates the play of a video game authorized by the Board upon the insertion of cash. Authorized video games include, but are not limited to, video poker, line up, and blackjack. The VGT must utilize a video display and microprocessors in which the player may receive free games or credits that can be redeemed for cash. VGT does not include a Terminal that directly dispenses coins, cash, or tokens or is for amusement purposes only.


Can local jurisdictions restrict the use of VGTs?

Yes. A municipality may pass an ordinance prohibiting video gaming within the corporate limits of the municipality. A county board may pass an ordinance prohibiting video gaming within the unincorporated areas of the county. Video gaming is not allowed in these communities.

The Village of Orland Park has such an ordinance prohibiting video gaming at this time.

In addition, a local government may hold a referendum proposing to prohibit video gaming in the municipality. This is otherwise known as an “opt-out” provision. A petition for referendum must be filed in the office of the clerk (municipal or county) at least 90 days before the date of an election. If a majority of the voters vote “YES,” video gaming shall be prohibited within the municipality or county. Petitions to prohibit video gaming shall be public documents. A list of the communities that have opted out of video gaming is posted on the IGB website. If you have any questions about the status of your community, please contact your local municipal authority.

How many communities have approved video gaming since it was approved in Illinois? 

968 governing bodies in Illinois have approved video gaming to some extent.

How is the revenue from gaming divided and what percentage does each recipient collect?

Video gambling revenues, after payouts to winners, are taxed at a flat 30 percent rate, with 25 percent going to the state and the other 5 percent going to the local municipality. The remaining 70 percent of revenue is divided equally between the establishments and terminal operators.


What is a "Class A" Liquor License? 

Class A License: A Class A license shall entitle the licensee to make sales at retail of alcoholic liquor from the premises specified for use or consumption on or off the premises where sold. The license fee for a Class A license shall be one thousand two hundred sixty dollars ($1,260.00) per annum for 2017, and then one thousand three hundred twenty dollars ($1,320.00) for 2018. No more than sixty-seven (67) licenses of this class shall be issued and in force at any one time.

Impact Study & Outlying Community Revenue Analysis

The Village of Orland Park (Orland Park) engaged Crowe Horwath LLP ("Crowe") to complete an economic impact study to better understand the quantitative impact that a potential food and beverage and gaming tax would have on its economy. Orland Park is exploring the possibility of implementing such taxes, as a way to increase General Fund revenue.



View the results of the study:


Economic Impact Study

*Analysis of Nearby Southwestern Suburban Communities'  2014-2016 Gaming Revenues

*Data derived from the Illinois Gaming Board at http://www.igb.illinois.gov/


Class A Liquor License Survey
Video Gaming Survey.png
A poll was conducted inquiring whether current Class A liquor license holders would be interested in offering video gaming at their places of business.  The results were the following:

Of the 67 Class A license holders,

23 said YES, they are interested in offering video gaming;
37 said NO, they are not interested in offering video gaming;
7 said they were UNDECIDED on the matter.